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High Country Hiking Tours only use good quality products, that we ourselves  have tested in this environment, to make sure that you are as comfortable as possible and enjoy hiking with us.                                                All our equipment is well maintained and serviced regularly.

We will provide the following equipment on our hiking tours. 

Please note that all images are examples only and item makes and models may vary.

Tents

Tents are on a two share basis.                                                                            We use two person, four season hiking tents. Our tents are quick and easy to erect. They are sturdy even in very windy conditions and can be erected in small areas.                                                                                                            

Sleeping Bags

We use four season down sleeping bags that are lightweight, comfortable and very easy to pack. The stuff sack with some of your clothes, such as a down jacket or a fleece top inside it, can serve as a pillow.

Sleeping Mat

Our self-inflating mats provide maximum comfort and warmth throughout the night.

Sleeping Bag Liner

We use silk sleeping bag liners to reduce bulk and weight.

Back Packs

We only use backpacks that provide good support and have fully adjustable harness, which provides unlimited freedom of movement. This means that no matter what height you are, the harness can be adjusted to your size. Our backpacks come with a hydration system that fits up to 2.5L hydration bladder and has bladder hose access point. The backpack has multiple storage pockets with easy access, walking pole attachment, SOS label and rain cover. For our multiday hikes, we use 65 and 70 litre backpacks, which can be extended by a further 15 litres if required.

Walking Poles

We use lightweight, strong, collapsable walking poles, that are quick and easy to assemble and pack away. We have walking poles suitable for hikers of any height.

Gaiters

Our gaiters are hard-wearing, easy to put on and adjust. They are worn to provide protection from branches and thorns and to prevent mud, snow and debris getting into your boots.

Head Torch

Our head torches are compact, lightweight and simple to use. They are a great piece of equipment as they keep your hands free to tackle any task at the campsite and on the track.

Cooking Stove & Fuel

Cooking stove and fuel are on a two share basis.                                  Compact and lightweight stove, which screws on to the gas cylinder.

Cooking Pots, Bowls, Cups & Sporks

Cooking pots are on a two share basis.                                                                We use lightweight and compact, but still strong and durable pots, bowls, cups and sporks.

We ask you to bring your own gear/equipment as follows.                          This equipment list is a guide only. You need to determine what clothes to bring. Try to limit the number of items to only what is absolutely necessary. Remember that what you pack, you carry. 

No cotton – Please do not bring along any cotton clothing including socks. When cotton gets wet, it ceases to insulate because all of the air pockets in the fabric fill up with water. When you hike, you perspire, and any cotton clothing touching your skin will absorb your sweat like a sponge. The right clothing and socks can make or break a hike.

No denim – Denim is heavy and absorbs water, sweat and mud as you hike. Damp denim is uncomfortable and slow to dry. In cold weather, wet denim will pull the heat from your skin and may dramatically increase the risk of hypothermia. Denim stays cold in cold weather and hot in the summer.

Boots – 1 pair                                                                                                     Hiking Boots are one of the most important items of hiking gear, since their quality and durability can determine a hiker’s ability to walk long distances without injury. Good quality hiking boots will ensure you have not only a comfortable but, more importantly, a safe hike. It does not matter if your preference are leather or polyester mesh boots, but they must be waterproof to keep your feet dry, sturdy with good ankle support, have solid soles with a good grip and be light enough to move easily, see examples below.                                                                                                                           It is very important that your boots are well-worn in. Please do not turn up with a brand new pair of hiking boots that you have never worn before.

Socks – clean pair for each day plus 1 spare pair                                          We recommend good quality woollen socks that fit well and are comfortable to wear. There are a number of brands that make great hiking socks. Invest in a good pair, you will not regret it and will realise soon enough that the socks are worth every cent you paid for them. The sock is, second to the hiking boot, the most important piece of equipment worn hiking.

Bed Socks – 1 pair to keep your feet warm on cold nights

Pants/Shorts – 1 pair (or 1 pair of long pants & 1 pair of shorts) Long pants that can convert into shorts are perfect for this type of hiking. One item serves two purposes and helps to reduce weight. It is also very easy to change from one to the other just by unzipping the legs off or zipping them back on. There is no need to take the pants off and to rummage in your backpack just to change from pants to shorts and back to pants.

Base Layer                                                                            Base layer should be a T-shirt or shirt made out of Merino wool or polyester.                                                                                                               Short sleeve top – 1 for 2 to 3 day hike                                                                    Long sleeve top – 1 for 2 to 3 day hike                                                                      On 4 to 5 day hikes – in warm weather, I recommend 2 short sleeve tops and 1 long sleeve top and in colder conditions, I recommend 1 short sleeve top and 2 long sleeve tops.

Mid Layer – 1                                                                                                    Mid layer must be a long sleeve top made of polyester fleece, Merino wool or goose down. Tops with a zipper are good as they will easily allow you to regulate your upper body temperature. 

Shell Layer – 1                                                                                                Shell layer must be waterproof and windproof, but should also be breathable. Good quality rain jacket made out of material such as Gore-Tex will provide all the protection you need. 

Waterproof pants – 1                                                                              Good quality windproof and breathable waterproof pants made out of material such as Gore-Tex will provide great protection in inclement weather. However, there are a number of waterproof pants on the market at lesser cost that will suffice. 

Thermal top and pants – 1 pair                                                    Thermal top will serve as an additional layer on very cold days and thermal pants are ideal to wear under your hiking or waterproof pants when you can really feel the chill in the air. They are also fabulous to sleep in. They will keep you feeling cosy and comfortable through the night.                                  There are many good quality thermal wear on the market with Merino wool being very popular, but can be costly. There are cheaper synthetic fabrics like acrylics that also have excellent wicking properties and are the cheaper options.

Warm hat – 1

Cap/Sun hat – 1

Gloves – 1 pair

Buff/Neck warmer/Scarf – 1

Underwear                                                                             Bra – 1 (sufficient for the entire hike)                                                   Underpants – clean pair for each day plus 1 spare pair

Sandals – 1 pair                                                                                    Lightweight compact sandals or crocks are great to change into at the end of the day and they are also a must for crossing creeks and rivers. Please do not bring thongs, you will need shoes that are securely strapped around your foot for river crossings. 

Spare shoelaces – 1 pair

Hydration bladder/Water bottle                                            Hydration bladders are a better option for hiking. You can slip them inside your pack and sip water along the way keeping your hands free. For more information regarding water go to Water Requirements

Water purifying/filtering system                                                    For more information refer to Water Requirements

Personal items – these items are not a requirement or a necessity, but they can help you relax and fill some spare time at the end of the day.            Reading material – book/magazine                                                                Playing cards                                                                                                    Mobile phone/iPod – please use headphones if you wish to listen to music

Camera including spare batteries and memory cards

Watch

Sunglasses

Pocket knife

Toiletries                                                                      Microfibre towel                                                                                        Toothbrush – small travel size is ideal                                                                     Toothpaste – small travel size is ideal                                                              Toilet paper – best kept in a ziplock bag                                                Sunscreen – small travel size                                                                            Hand sanitiser                                                                                                        Wet wipes – they are ideal to wipe yourself down with at the end of the day to freshen up                                                                                                          Roll-on deodorant – please do not bring large deodorant sprays and perfumes                                                                                                    Moisturiser – small tube                                                                                          Lip balm                                                                                                            Tissues                                                                                                                Comb – small and compact                                                                                  Hair ties                                                                                                                Floss                                                                                                                        Insect repellent – small travel size is ideal                                                          Nail file                                                                                                                      Nail clippers

Personal First Aid Kit                                                                           Your First Aid Kit should include all your personal medication, band aids, blister band aids, painkillers, anti-inflammatories and anything else that you think you might require. 

Food                                                                                        For food ideas refer to Food under Essential Info. 

Ziplock bags                                                                                                Couple of medium size ziplock bags are ideal to carry rubbish in.

Bathers – the only opportunity for a dip is on the Ritchie’s Hut Tour. The overnight camp is close to Howqua River, which is very cold, but very refreshing on hot days.

Small stuff sack or a plastic bag  for dirty laundry                                                                                                                                                      Bathers are not included on our Equipment Checklist. 

Print this Equipment Checklist and tick items off as you pack.          Equipment Checklist – Multi Day Hikes

High Country Hiking Tours only use good quality products, that we ourselves  have tested in this environment, to make sure that you are as comfortable as possible and enjoy hiking with us.                                              All our equipment is well maintained and serviced regularly.

We will provide the following equipment on our hiking tours. 

Please note that all images are examples only and item makes and models may vary.

Walking Poles

We use lightweight, strong, collapsable walking poles, that are quick and easy to assemble and pack away. We have walking poles suitable for hikers of any height.

Gaiters

Our gaiters are hard-wearing, easy to put on and adjust. They are worn to provide protection from branches and thorns and to prevent mud, snow and debris getting into your boots.

We ask you to bring your own gear/equipment as follows.                          This equipment list is a guide only. You need to determine what clothes to bring. Try to limit the number of items to only what is absolutely necessary. Remember that what you pack, you carry. 

No cotton – Please do not bring along any cotton clothing including socks. When cotton gets wet, it ceases to insulate because all of the air pockets in the fabric fill up with water. When you hike, you perspire, and any cotton clothing touching your skin will absorb your sweat like a sponge. The right clothing and socks can make or break a hike.

No denim – Denim is heavy and absorbs water, sweat and mud as you hike. Damp denim is uncomfortable and slow to dry. In cold weather, wet denim will pull the heat from your skin and may dramatically increase the risk of hypothermia. Denim stays cold in cold weather and hot in the summer.

Daypack with waterproof cover

Boots – 1 pair                                                                                                 Hiking Boots are one of the most important items of hiking gear, since their quality and durability can determine a hiker’s ability to walk long distances without injury. Good quality hiking boots will ensure you have not only a comfortable but, more importantly, a safe hike. It does not matter if your preference are leather or polyester mesh boots, but they must be waterproof to keep your feet dry, sturdy with good ankle support, have solid soles with a good grip and be light enough to move easily, see examples below.                                                                                                                            It is very important that your boots are well-worn in. Please do not turn up with a brand new pair of hiking boots that you have never worn before.

Socks – 2 pairs (1 pair to wear, 1 spare pair)                                                  We recommend good quality woollen socks that fit well and are comfortable to wear. There are a number of brands that make great hiking socks. Invest in a good pair, you will not regret it and will realise soon enough that the socks are worth every cent you paid for them. The sock is, second to the hiking boot, the most important piece of equipment worn hiking.

Pants/Shorts – 1 pair (or 1 pair of long pants & 1 pair of shorts)        Long pants that can convert into shorts are perfect for this type of hiking. One item serves two purposes and helps to reduce weight. It is also very easy to change from one to the other just by unzipping the legs off or zipping them back on. There is no need to take the pants off and to rummage in your backpack just to change from pants to shorts and back to pants.                                                                                                                      Even on warm days, it is important to bring a pair of long pants as the weather in the High Country can change very quickly.

Base Layer – 1                                                                                                Base layer should be a short sleeve or long sleeve T-shirt or shirt made out of either Merino wool or polyester. 

Mid Layer – 1                                                                                                    Mid layer must be a long sleeve top made of polyester fleece, Merino wool or goose down. Tops with a zipper are good as they will easily allow you to regulate your upper body temperature. 

Shell Layer – 1                                                                                                Shell layer must be waterproof and windproof, but should also be breathable. Good quality rain jacket made out of material such as Gore-Tex will provide all the protection you need. 

Waterproof pants – 1                                                                                Good quality windproof and breathable waterproof pants made out of material such as Gore-Tex will provide great protection in inclement weather. However, there are a number of waterproof pants on the market at lesser cost that will suffice. 

Thermal top and pants – 1 pair (on cold days)                          Thermal top will serve as an additional layer on very cold days and thermal pants are ideal to wear under your hiking or waterproof pants when you can really feel the chill in the air.                                                                              There are many good quality thermal wear on the market with Merino wool being very popular, but can be costly. There are cheaper synthetic fabrics like acrylics that also have excellent wicking properties and are the cheaper options.

Warm hat – 1 (on cooler days)

Cap/Sun hat – 1

Gloves – 1 pair (on cooler days)

Buff/Neck warmer/Scarf – 1                                                            A buff can come handy on any given day whether it’s holding your hair back, wiping the sweat away or keeping the breeze of your neck, but neck warmer or a scarf are only required on cooler days.

Spare shoelaces – 1 pair

Hydration bladder/Water bottle                                            Hydration bladders are a better option for hiking. You can slip them inside your pack and sip water along the way keeping your hands free. For more information regarding water go to Water Requirements

Camera including spare batteries and memory cards

Watch

Sunglasses

Pocket knife

Toiletries                                                                                                Toilet paper – best kept in a ziplock bag                                                Sunscreen – small travel size                                                                                  Hand sanitiser                                                                                                               Lip balm                                                                                                            Tissues                                                                                                                Insect repellent – small travel size is ideal                                                          

Personal First Aid Kit                                                                           Your First Aid Kit should include all your personal medication, band aids, blister band aids, painkillers, anti-inflammatories and anything else that you think you might require. 

Food                                                                                         For food ideas refer to Food under Essential Info. 

Ziplock bags                                                                                                Couple of medium size ziplock bags are ideal to carry rubbish in. 

Print this Equipment Checklist and tick items off as you pack.      Equipment Checklist – One Day Hikes